Sally Recommends To Kill A Mockingbird

This is the most brilliant story of one community’s injustice in small-town America, the consequences of to killwhich resonate throughout society at large. There has never been (and can never be) another “To Kill a Mockingbird”, and the most amazing thing about this novel is that it can be read, re-read and read again generation after generation, and its magic only ever increases.I must have read this story at least five times in the past two years since I first discovered it, sometimes returning right back to the start after closing the book.  I only wish I could remain immersed in Harper Lee’s bygone age and beautifully crafted characters, and not have to reach that last page.I don’t know whether it is a good or bad thing that Harper Lee has only written this one story, because I doubt ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ could be surpassed. Scout’s narration presents both a child’s world in adult terms, and an adult world from a child’s point of view, providing much comic relief amidst the drama and heartfelt emotion.Atticus Finch is probably one of the most heroic characters in fiction, and a role model for fathers everywhere. Although the trial itself is a tense moment in the story, and educational from a historical point of view, it is the Finch family dynamic that has made me so attached to this story. The first part of the book, when the children are younger and still relatively blind to the world that surrounds them, provides the most enjoyable reading.Jem and Scout are delightfully child-like, and the effect of a hindsight narrative only adds to the many layers to be found here.

– Sally

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